The National Catholic Review

In All Things

  • College fraternity scandals are back in the news. The University of Oklahoma has moved to disband the Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapter and punish its leadership following an investigation of their singing on a bus ride—with high school students they wanted to enlist—a racist song learned at National Leadership School four years ago. The song, which they captured on video, boasts that Sigma Alpha will never have a black member and refers to the lynching of a black person. The frat members, of...

  • Cambridge, MA. As a comparative theologian, I can affirm that Holy Week is incomparable. The last days of Jesus, his last supper and his passion and death, can be revered as without any exact parallel in other religious traditions.

  • Lent is almost over, and I must say, I am relieved: this is not my favorite liturgical season. Give me the little pleasures of Ordinary Time, or the serene expectation of Advent, rather than the sober confrontation of the forty days. Still, I understand why the church invites us into this time of fasting. Regularly in our spiritual life we need to examine our conscience and invite God’s purification. We need to make a new start. And so once again I bring the old questions before God: Where...

  • “It is mercy I desire, not sacrifice.”

  • Why should I care about Sweet Briar College, whether it lives or dies?

  • With his call for a Jubilee Year of Mercy from Dec. 8, 2015, to Nov. 20, 2016, Pope Francis has opened up a space for possible discussion at the international level. A Year of Mercy provides the opportunity to advance several issues that affect people on the periphery. These are a source of pain.

  • Steven D. Greydanus (Decent Films)

    Steven D. Greydanus is an American Catholic film critic who writes for the National Catholic Register and founded the...

  • Jean-François Millet’s The Angelus portrays something that, for many people today, is a foreign experience. A pair of farmworkers, a man and a woman, set aside their work-tools and bend in prayer—she, with her hands clasped, and he, holding his hat. A basket of potatoes lies below and between them. The diffuse light, against which they are nearly shadows, suggests dusk. A steeple in the distance suggests the sound of bells.

    The novelty in question: Work actually comes to an...

  • Cambridge, MA. As readers will know, I am meditating with you on “The Bhagavad Gita in Lent” and more practically, I am also teaching a seminar on the Gita this semester, for about 20 students. We are this week reading Chapter 3 (yes, third chapter, and the semester is at least half over!), on detached action, action as a sacrifice and service for the sake of the world, and hardest of all, action as what happens by way of nature and time and providence, our selves not really the doers of “...